Help - Search - Members - Calendar
Full Version: ALBUM OF THE WEEK - 1/4/17 - 1/13/17, PUBLIC ENEMY - IT TAKES A NATION OF MILLIONS TO HOLD US BACK
Streetlight Manifesto Unofficial Forum > RISC > Streetlight Manifesto
?Rorshach?
PUBLIC ENEMY - IT TAKES A NATION OF MILLIONS TO HOLD US BACK



QUOTE
It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back is the second studio album by American hip hop group Public Enemy, released on June 28, 1988, by Def Jam Recordings.[1] Public Enemy set out to make the hip hop equivalent to Marvin Gaye's What's Going On, an album noted for its strong social commentary. Recording sessions took place during 1987 at Chung King Studios, Greene St. Recording, and Sabella Studios in New York City. Noting the enthusiastic response toward their live shows, Public Enemy intended with Nation of Millions to make the music of a faster tempo than the previous album for performance purposes.[3]

The album charted for 49 weeks on the US Billboard 200, peaking at number 42. By August 1989, it was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America, for shipments of one million copies in the United States. The album was very well received by music critics, who hailed it for its production techniques and the socially and politically charged lyricism of lead MC Chuck D. It also appeared on many publications' year-end top album lists for 1988 and was the runaway choice as the best album of 1988 in The Village Voice's Pazz & Jop critics' poll, a poll of the leading music critics in the US.[4]

Since its initial reception, It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back has been regarded by music writers and publications as one of the greatest and most influential albums of all time.[5][6][7] In 2003, the album was ranked number 48 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time, the highest ranking of all the hip hop albums on the list, and the only one acknowledged in the top hundred.


CODE
https://thepiratebay.org/torrent/3221672/Public_Enemy_-_It_Takes_A_Nation_Of_Millions_To_Hold_Us_Back


---------------

PREVIOUS PICKS

3/31/14 - 4/13/14 - MICHAEL JACKSON - THRILLER
3/24/14 - 3/31/14 - HUEY LEWIS AND THE NEWS - SPORTS
3/17/14 - 3/24/14 - QUEEN - A NIGHT AT THE OPERA
3/10/14 - 3/17/14 - THE CURE - THE HEAD ON THE DOOR
3/3/14 - 3/10/14 - BUILT TO SPILL - PERFECT FROM NOW ON
2/24/14 - 3/3/14 - BOB DYLAN - HIGHWAY 61 REVISITED
2/17/14 - 2/24/14 - RADIOHEAD - OK COMPUTER
2/10/14 - 2/17/14 - JEFF BUCKLEY - GRACE
2/3/14 - 2/10/14 - DAVID BOWIE - THE RISE AND FALL OF ZIGGY STARDUST AND SPIDERS FROM MARS
1/27/14 - 2/2/14 - CAROLE KING - TAPESTRY
1/20/14 - 1/27/14 - CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVIVAL - COSMOS FACTORY
1/4/14 - 1/20/14 - AMY WHINEHOUSE - BACK TO BLACK
12/24/13 - 1/3/14 - BRUCE SPRINGSTEIN - BORN TO RUN
12/16/13 - 12/23/13 - A TRIBE CALLED QUEST - LOW END THEORY
12/8/13 - 12/15/13 - JOY DIVISION - UNKNOWN PLEASURES
Logan
As a former suburban white kid, it's super interesting to hear Flavor Flav contextualized as a rapper instead of a minor VH1 Celebrity. Like, when he says "Yeah, boy" that shit is cutting edge. Growing up, that shit was a joke – like a side gag on The Bachelorette. I didn't have stuff like this growing up which might also be a generational thing.

The production on this thing is gorgeous. It sounds so much like New York City.
HighonFez
Hey Dylan, remember that time at Summerfest we saw Public Enemy and I rapped all of Don't Believe the Hype? lolll


That was a huge realization when I got either this or Fear of a Black Planet back in high school: Flavor Flav was the greatest hype man in the business. And also can play some mean slap bass. "Cold Lampin" was the moment I realized that he is a great rapper in his own right. Chuck D was woke before woke was woke. Or something.

They really only had two great albums, but those two albums are this perfect combination of hip-as-fuck production, real revolutionary things to say and infectious energy. And this is the better of the two. So, yeah. I'm a pretty big fan of It Takes a Nation of Millions.
YumOJ
QUOTE (Logan @ Jan 5 2017, 07:02 PM) *
As a former suburban white kid, it's super interesting to hear Flavor Flav contextualized as a rapper instead of a minor VH1 Celebrity. Like, when he says "Yeah, boy" that shit is cutting edge. Growing up, that shit was a joke – like a side gag on The Bachelorette. I didn't have stuff like this growing up which might also be a generational thing.

I've been trying to get into this album for a while and it's hard for me to get past this aspect of it.
?Rorshach?
I'm really stoked to have found this record. Over the past few years, I've been looking for the hip hop that came on the radio when I was a kid, that quickly made my mom change the channel because I "wasn't old enough".

We checked out Low End Theory and that record fucking rules in its own right, but it definitely wasn't the sound I had been looking for. It's smoother and cooler and more mellow. Even Paul's Boutique didn't quite have the energy I was after.

It Take a Nation of Millions gets me so hyped though.

Honestly, I think it feels super punk rock. It's got so much energy and attitude; it's super smart, but also super fun. On my first time through it, I was singing along to hooks and bobbing my head and rocking out in my kitchen.

I agree with all the sentiments about Flava Flav. I kind of liken his VH1 stardom to when Travis Barker got his "newlyweds" show. "Massively Monster Musician Turns Culture Clown for Big Bucks!"
This is a "lo-fi" version of our main content. To view the full version with more information, formatting and images, please click here.
IPB NULL EN